Our role in conservation is to create direct and positive connections between wildlife and people. We protect endangered species, increase understanding of wildlife and inspire community action.
How we are helping

Taronga Zoo Blog

Friday 5th July 2013
The soulful sounds of a saxophone echoed across the Zoo this morning, when Steve, one of the Elephant Keepers put on a solo performance for Casey our Leopard Seal.
Thursday 4th July 2013
You may have seen the massive tanks that house Taronga’s Platypus at Wild Australia, but you’d never guess what infrastructure lies above it. A network of tunnels and nest boxes make up 20 meters of burrows that the platypus’ call home. This incredible egg laying mammal has different nest boxes for different activities, much the same way that we have a bedroom, kitchen and lounge room. Find out more about their home here.
Giovanni Pilu
Thursday 4th July 2013
From late July Taronga will offer a Piazza inspired by classic Italian cafes. Chef Giovanni Pilu, Head Chef and owner of the award winning two-hatted Pilu at Freshwater, has come to the table to create a menu for Zoo visitors at the free top plaza that combines authentic flavours from Sardinia, Italy, with local harvest. Here you can enjoy home-baked cakes with a Lavazza coffee or the perfect lunch bowl of Sardinian pasta with sausage ragu. Is your mouth watering? Read the full story here.
Small-clawed Otter
Thursday 4th July 2013
Taronga’s Small -clawed Otters which live along the Rainforest Trail are always great fun to watch. There never seems to be a quiet moment as they’re in and out of the water. Being incredibly intelligent and social animals the keepers constantly have to comeup with new ideas to keep them active and content. Read this story by Otter Keeper Jordan to learn about the mischievous trio – Houdini, Soa and Bising.
Kibali
Tuesday 2nd July 2013
A year ago Kibali our new adolescent gorilla arrived at Taronga Zoo from France. A year on, Kibali has celebrated another birthday in March turning 12 and keepers are seeing lots of changes in this young male gorilla.
Tuesday 2nd July 2013
They’ve got some of the foulest breath of any animal in the Zoo. They’ve got a fearsome reputation, with folklore suggesting they can kill men with their breath alone, possess spiritual powers to cause untold sickness and can spit their venom and leap several metres in the air to attack ...and we’ve just hatched out four of them!
Friday 28th June 2013
When you think large raptors visions of prehistoric beasts from the pages of ‘Jurassic Park’ may come to mind, however raptors also refers to a specialised group of birds, named for their powerful gripping feet. The largest of those found in Australia is the Wedge-tailed eagle, sporting an incredible wingspan of 2.2m tip to tip. If you’ve not seen one, you are missing out, but luckily to witness these birds in flight you won’t need to travel back 65 million years, you can visit us down at the Bird Show and meet our newest addition, a 12-month old male Wedge-tail.
Friday 14th June 2013
There was a buzz in the air as our guests arrived, cameras clicking and smiles all round. With the spectacular view of Sydney Harbour in the background, this was clearly going to be an exciting event as the finalists for Tourism Australia’s The Best Jobs in the World competition joined keepers in the Bird Show amphitheatre. To greet them, there was myself and some other members of the Taronga team, including a Diamond Python, Short-beaked Echidna, White-tailed Cockatoo and my counterpart “Nangaw”, the Powerful Owl.
Thursday 13th June 2013
Taronga Zoo is home to six Australian File Snakes. You may have walked past them in Reptile World but may have not stopped to appreciate how amazing they are. They live in fresh water and their rough scales help them hold fast on to fish that become a meal. Even more fascinating is that they can devour a whole fish in 15 seconds! See the video of them during mealtime here.
Angophora leaves and Rengent Honeyeater
Thursday 13th June 2013
Taronga Zoo celebrates NAIDOC week for three weeks every year, providing an opportunity for visitors to discover more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their culture and their connections to animals.