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Carnaby's Black Cockatoo
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Scientific Name: 
Calyptorhynchus latirostris
Phylum: 
Chordata
Species class: 
Aves
Order: 
Psittaciformes
Genus: 
Calyptorhynchus
Species: 
latirostris
Status: 
Endangered
Population Trend: 
Decreasing
Distribution Map: 
Distribution map - Carnaby's Black Cockatoo

The Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) are endemic to Western Australia, meaning that they are found nowhere else in the world. Once numerous, the charismatic and highly mobile Carnaby’s Black- Cockatoo is now classified in Western Australia as ‘rare or likely to become extinct’ and is federally listed as Endangered. The last 50 years has seen a 50% decline in their population, and their range has been reduced by up to one-third. The main cause of their decline is loss of breeding habitat.

These cockatoos only nests in hollows of large, old, mainly Eucalypt trees. Much of the breeding habitat for the Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo now occurs on private land in agricultural areas of Western Australia. Breeding hollows and trees often occur in areas of remnant bush or paddock trees on farms and may be lost through tree senescence, clearing for tracks and firebreaks, stock activity, or fire. Feeding habitat in native bush on farms is often lost or degraded through similar processes.

Because cockatoos are long lived birds (up to 50 years) and they raise few chicks to adulthood, it is highly likely that the birds we see today are an ageing population. Therefore, it is essential that we protect remaining habitat as well as the birds themselves for the survival of the species 

 

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