Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
The redevelopment of Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s front entrance area is continuing with a number of key milestones achieved and the new Visitor Plaza well and truly taking shape.
In June, with 17 other researchers, I helped catch 20 wild dugongs in Moreton Bay, off Brisbane in Queensland to check their health and reproductive status.
As Dubbo’s temperature plunge there’s been a number of frosty starts to the mornings, so some of the animals are finding ways to beat the winter chills and stay warm.
Taronga Western Plains Zoo and its visitors have helped raise over $1200 at Rhino May Day last month to help save the critically endangered Sumatran Rhino.
Over the past few weeks, our new Black Rhino calf Kufara has grown in confidence as well as size. We estimate that she would now weigh at least four times her birth weight and be around 120 kilograms.
Taronga Western Plains Zoo has welcomed its fourth Eland calf in the past three months. Born on Friday 11 June 2010 this male calf is now coming out from its hiding place and mingling with the herd including the three other calves. Once born female Eland will hide their offspring because in the wild they would be easy prey for animals such as Lions.
While the Hippo Lake and Beach area undergoes some maintenance, the Hippos are enjoying a change of scenery in their temporary home.
Earlier this year I travelled to Assam in north-eastern India to visit Manas and Kaziranga National Parks on the three week trip for the Asian Rhino Project and the International Rhino Foundation to inspect work on two conservation projects the Taronga Conservation Society Australia (TCSA) is helping to fund.
In early April, a member of the public brought in a wombat which had been hit by a car. The wombat had head injuries and couldn’t use his legs correctly.
Today Ushindi, one of our hand-raised Cheetah born in 2008, had his annual health check. We were keen to check his development and to ensure he was fit and well.

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