Come and visit Taronga Zoo's new arrival! Find Out More ▶
Twilight at Taronga Tickets on Sale! Buy Tickets ▶
Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video ▶
The next generation in Taronga Zoo’s international conservation breeding program for Western Lowland Gorillas has moved into their refurbished Gorilla Forest exhibit.
Every day, our gorillas are given a variety of leaves and branches for them to eat as part of their diet, but some days it seems like more fun for the young gorillas to either run around with them or try their hand at building nests. Recently, our five year old male, Fuzu, found himself out on exhibit with lots of Olive branches, so he tried his hand at making a day nest.
Looking after Taronga’s gorillas keeps the primate team busy and always looking for new ideas to challenge them. With Easter just around the corner, it was a great opportunity for keepers to get creative and bring a little fun into the gorillas Environmental Enrichment program with an Easter theme.
Working at Taronga Zoo involves a lot more than feeding of animals and cleaning out their exhibits. As a keeper, one of our most important roles is to speak and act on behalf of the animals in our care. We aim to educate and inspire people to care about the natural environment and the animals that rely on it for survival.
With the passing of another year, Taronga’s young Western Lowland Gorilla Mahale, shows no sign of changing the way he gets about.
A tiny female Western Lowland Gorilla has been born at Taronga Zoo. Born to experienced mother ‘Kriba’ on Saturday 15 January, the youngster has been named ‘Kipenzi’ which means ‘precious one’ in Swahili.
In our family of eight gorillas, we have four youngsters. Our youngest is Mahali who turned two in August. Mahali has recently become a very independent and is embracing his new found freedom and confidence. Every day he’s moving further away from his mother, Mouila.
One of the most common questions we get asked after our Keeper Talk is: “Is that gorilla pregnant?”. The majority of the time the answer is no, “but why do their bellies look so big?”.
ver the last few months we’ve been training and conditioning our gorilla group to prepare for our eldest female juvenile, Mbeli, to travel to Melbourne to join the international breeding program for this endangered species.
As 2009 and the Year of the Gorilla came to an end, the efforts to conserve these majestic animals are still ongoing with conservation and research, education awareness and our campaign “They’re calling on you” for recycling of mobile phones. We’ve all made a difference but we must keep on making a difference, so log onto the icon for our campaign and get involved.

Pages