Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
A welcome message from the United Nations: The United Nations declared 2010 to be the International Year of Biodiversity. It is a celebration of life on earth and of the value of biodiversity for our lives. The world is invited to take action in 2010 to safeguard the variety of life on earth: biodiversity.
The crazy ups and downs of the weather lately have made for some interesting flying for Dixie the Whistling Kite. On the hot, still days she has done more sitting than flying but the constantly changing temperatures and wind directions have meant that on other days she’s done some spectacular flying. Southerly breezes bring the best flying conditions to the bird show and those are the days that I feel truly lucky to be doing this job!
As 2009 and the Year of the Gorilla came to an end, the efforts to conserve these majestic animals are still ongoing with conservation and research, education awareness and our campaign “They’re calling on you” for recycling of mobile phones. We’ve all made a difference but we must keep on making a difference, so log onto the icon for our campaign and get involved.
Taronga’s giant Kodiak Bear ‘Bethyl’ is celebrated her 33rd birthday this week making her one of the oldest of her species in the world!
Lately we have been doing quite a bit of work with falcons at Bird Show, rehabilitating Clarkie, lure flying Khan and recently we’ve been training Nike. Nike is a female Peregrine Falcon named after the Greek goddess of Victory. When we lure fly our falcons, the falcons always win. I thought the name was very appropriate.
Our three male pelicans in our marine precinct Great Southern Oceans are preparing to show off their amazing wild behaviours in the daily Seal Shows. As part of their training we take them on short stroll from their coastal home and walk them over to the Seal Theatre most mornings.
During the recent hot weather the elephant herd have been spending some extra time in their cool mud wallow.
Orphaned animals are regularly brought to Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s Wildlife Hospital however; it is not very often that they are a baby Dusty Moorhen. This young Dusty Moorhen was brought to the Zoo by a member of the public after being found on its own at the Narromine weir.
This breeding season has been one of Taronga’s most successful. In the last few months 16 Little Penguin chicks have hatched and there are 10 more on the way!
A Lace Monitor (often referred to as a Goanna) was brought into Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s Wildlife Hospital in early December by a member of the public after it was hit by a car.

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There's no mistaking these sunrise silhouettes at #tarongawesternplainszoo http://t.co/s0RRlmIBWr
ABC reports new research shows feral cats spreading herpes to native animals http://t.co/M3aE7UOrun
Kirra looks to be enjoying her new diet! Our Koala joey is making the transition from milk to eucalyptus leaves. http://t.co/GLoz95rTjS

Public Notices

Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.
Taronga's male elephant Luk Chai is being seen by an expert elephant dentist tomorrow to check out his teeth and tusks. Luk Chai has especially small brittle tusks which, through normal play he damages and has suffered recurrent infections.
Taronga is having an important safety evacuation drill after 3pm on Monday 8 December and all staff and visitors will be evacuated.
Taronga’s commitment to all animals in its care includes the provision of a stimulating and rich environment full of challenges and activities.