Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
Taronga Western Plains Zoo is supporting Rhino May Day to help raise awareness for the plight of the five Rhino species in the wild.
Time has flown by as keepers try to keep up with baby Francois Langur, Ganju’s amazing progress. Yesterday, he celebrated his three week birthday, a big milestone in any infants life.
Volunteers and keepers spent yesterday afternoon and today tracking the 43 Regents that we have sent out into the wild.
Monday's Qantas flight to Albury carrying the second group of 21 Regents was delayed due to thick fog, with the temperature plunging down to 1.5C!! Glad I was there last week!!
Amala, the Greater One -Horned Rhinoceros arrived at Taronga Western Plains Zoo last year from Los Angeles. She is a future breeding partner for Dora, our adult male Greater One-Horned Rhino. Amala is only four years old and weighs approx 1200kgs. We will consider introducing this pair when Amala is a little older and approaching 1600kgs. Amala has settled into her new home quite well and is becoming comfortable with her daily routine.
Taronga celebrates the dedication of its volunteers during National Volunteer Week. Check out the video and learn more about the Zoos’ quiet achievers
Today we had a very sad reminder of just how vulnerable our precious native wildlife is. A male Common Wombat was bought to Taronga’s Wildlife Hospital late yesetrday after being hit by a car.
Taronga Western Plains Zoo has a number of reasons to celebrate Mother’s Day this year with an abundance of first time mothers giving birth over the past few months!
This morning our local volunteers came out to help and then we opened the tent zippers on two tents.One group of Regents flew out in about five minutes and the second group left gradually, with the last two birds really taking their time and flying off after about two hours.
Not many people realise what it takes to make sure all of the animals at Taronga Zoo are fed the appropriate diet. With many species, this needs to include live vertebrates, or insects. That doesn’t mean a fly here and there or a cricket or two. We are talking in the tens of thousands and tens of kilos.

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Our giant platypus will be swimming rain or shine tonight! Bring a brolly and join us at #VividSydney from 5.30pm. https://t.co/dNUMAg0MRq
A bird believed to be locally extinct has been spotted in Nepal for the first time in 178 years: https://t.co/iOf5JyQqQp via
Kenya's new front in poaching battle: 'the future is in the hands of our communities' https://t.co/bCeWFWpxn1 via

Public Notices

As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.
Taronga's male elephant Luk Chai is being seen by an expert elephant dentist tomorrow to check out his teeth and tusks. Luk Chai has especially small brittle tusks which, through normal play he damages and has suffered recurrent infections.