Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
Members of Youth At The Zoo (YATZ) and the Jane Goodall Institute Australia (JGIA) Roots and Shoots program came together to celebrate the United Nations International Day of Peace.
Taronga is about to mark a century of not-for-profit work bringing people and wildlife together.
The Taronga Zoomobile headed out to Trunkey Creek last week to present workshops on threatened species to children from local schools.
The efforts of two of Taronga’s Volunteers were recognised last week as part of in The Centre for Volunteering’s NSW Volunteer of the Year Awards program.
Scientists from the Australian Registry of Wildlife Health at Taronga and Zoo reptile specialists are preparing to search in the Bellinger River area to find out what species may be carrying the virus killing the now critically endangered Bellinger River Snapping Turtles.
Zoos are an important bridge to the natural world for people that are increasingly separated from the environment and animals.
Threatened species are actually all around us but they often get overlooked, or we forget their connection with our daily lives.
On this day each year, we in the animal care industry reflect on what happened in the past and how we can safeguard our endangered species in the future.
Taronga’s much-loved Malayan Tapir, Berani, has moved to a new home at Hunter Valley Zoo.

Pages

Twitter

Meet 'Jiemba’! He was named by students helping to protect gliders and their habitat. https://t.co/V8DWQMpaZe https://t.co/u7KgxmmdzR
He may be tiny, but this Yellow-bellied Glider joey is about to play a big role protecting his vulnerable species. https://t.co/g8u7L0FHjI
4 tonnes of suspected Pangolin scales, worth $9.8 million, seized by Hong Kong customs. https://t.co/OCf4qRmijq

Public Notices

Taronga Zoo advises that an item sold during the recent Vivid festival at the Zoo poses a potential hazard if broken apart.
As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.