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It’s just over two years since Taronga became home to 10 wild caught quokkas from Rottnest Island, West Australia, and they’ve certainly settled in producing five tiny joeys!
On the 7th of November, an orphaned baby Flying Fox called ‘Duruga’ was brought into the Taronga Wildlife Hospital and into my life. I became his ‘mother’.
With Taronga’s magnificent view of the Sydney skyline, many visitors ask what happens to our animals on New Year’s Eve and during other celebrations which involve fireworks on the Harbour.
Hi, it’s Brendan again, still on exchange in Canada, and very slowly loosing the ability to feel in each and every one of my fingers.
Taronga’s keepers and animal behaviouralists surprised many of the Zoo animals with Christmas-themed treats and puzzles today.
Christmas has come early for the Ring-tailed Lemurs which received some special treats today just before Christmas.
Taronga’s surrogate bat mum, Tegan, has discovered her orphaned Grey-headed Flying Fox, Duruga, has a favourite fruit.
This morning when the sun was shining and the storm was still out to the west our elephant herd were casually munching on their morning feed of palm trunks.
Often I tell people that when I was a young keeper the very last thing I wanted to do was to work with primates. Not because I did not like them but I felt they would be to hard to understand, too complex, too difficult.
With the rain came a new arrival, a Przewalski’s Horse foal born on Wednesday, 01 December. Whilst officially this was the first day of summer, the little filly named ‘Solongo’ meaning ‘rainbow’ in Mongolian, arrived into what has been a wet start to the summer season.

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Experienced father, Lazarus, keeps an eye on one of his mischievous lion cubs at Taronga Western Plains Zoo. http://t.co/vayaG2MXTk
He may only be a few months old, but our Australian Sea-lion pup Max already knows how to strike a pose! http://t.co/WvhDQirxRn
“Have I got something in my teeth?” Wombats like Chloe have rodent-like front teeth that never stop growing! http://t.co/8Sg1cfwWGk

Public Notices

Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.
Taronga's male elephant Luk Chai is being seen by an expert elephant dentist tomorrow to check out his teeth and tusks. Luk Chai has especially small brittle tusks which, through normal play he damages and has suffered recurrent infections.
Taronga is having an important safety evacuation drill after 3pm on Monday 8 December and all staff and visitors will be evacuated.
Taronga’s commitment to all animals in its care includes the provision of a stimulating and rich environment full of challenges and activities.