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Taronga’s amazing Barbary Sheep herd of 18 have all completed their annual health checks.
Recently we got to release one of our more graceful patients back to the wild, ‘Belinda’ a juvenile Black Swan. Belinda had swallowed some carelessly discarded fishing hooks and line. Read more about her recovery and return to Manly Dam.
Looking after Taronga’s gorillas keeps the primate team busy and always looking for new ideas to challenge them. With Easter just around the corner, it was a great opportunity for keepers to get creative and bring a little fun into the gorillas Environmental Enrichment program with an Easter theme.
Happy Sustainable Seafood Day! Why should you care, I hear you ask? There will always be plenty of fish in the sea, or so the old adage goes, but is this true?
Whether they have wings, fluffy tails or long tails, a great way in training your little one is to make special healthy treats and activities they will love you for. Our Carnivore Keeper Deb has come up with a range of activities and treats for your pet birds, rats, mice and rabbits. Read more about keeping your pets entertained here.
Visitor favourite Tuka the Komodo Dragon has been joined by two 16 month old juveniles in the exhibit next door. The two dragons arrived from Los Angeles Zoo recently. Keepers have started using lasers to train the youngsters to station at meal time as sharing dinner can get ugly. Read more about our new residents and how to train a dragon here.
Very little has been know about the Giant Armadillo until now. Taronga helps support a team of Brazilian researchers which have begun understanding the biology of this mysterious creature after extensively filming the Giant Armadillo in its natural habitat for over two years. In a world first the scientists registered the mating and birth on camera.
Gijima the male Cheetah at Taronga Western Plains Zoo took a trip to the dentist recently.
Year 10 students from St John’s College converged on Sandy Beach at the Macquarie River today to learn about their local ecosystems and the importance of protecting our waterways and wetlands.
The impact that zoos can have on the conservation of species is limited by the amount of space and resources they can offer to house and breed each species. Zoos therefore carefully balance the resources available with the potential contribution to a species’ survival. This means that each animal in the zoo must have a clearly defined role so that the available resources go to the best possible conservation outcomes. Read more here.

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Twitter

We’re delighted to introduce our new gorilla baby boy, Mjukuu! Both he, and first-time mum, Mbeli are doing great! http://t.co/LzJsoi5SlP
RT @dailytelegraph: Ever heard of a bits-o-saurus? See this amazing slideshow snapped at @tarongazoo #dinosaurs http://t.co/lLmNkq6OlW http…
RT @AmberSherlock: It's going to be a scorcher tomorrow! I'll have the forecast with my friendly T-Rex coming up @9NewsSyd @tarongazoo http…

Public Notices

A fire broke out in a service building on the perimeter of Taronga Zoo overnight. Fire Brigade crews attended and extinguished the fire before 3am. No people or animals were injured in the fire. Preliminary investigations have found no suspicious circumstances.
Taronga Zoo has very different policies on animal care than the Copenhagen Zoo.
SUBORDINATE LEGISLATION ACT 1989 ZOOLOGICAL PARKS BOARD ACT 1973 AND ZOOLOGICAL PARKS REGULATION 2014 TARONGA CONSERVATION SOCIETY AUSTRALIA
While you’re out and about you may notice that some of Taronga’s Wild! Rhinos may have apparently wandered away from their locations.