Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
Taronga celebrated its 550 volunteers and their incredible contribution to wild life through behavioural studies, administration, guest services and countless other areas across both our zoos during National Volunteer Week 2012. These astonishing volunteers contributed over 100,000 hours of their time in the past year.
The Taronga Wildlife Hospital treats an average of 40 marine turtles each year that have been washed up on beaches or found floating, unable to swim in the sea. The task of rehabilitating and releasing these animals along with hundreds of other native animals that come into the hospital’s care is the task of Taronga’s veterinarians and nurses.
Taronga Western Plains Zoo has recently welcomed the arrival of three Ring-tailed Lemurs from Rome Zoo in Italy.
Keepers are excited by the arrival of a female Addax calf on Tuesday 8 May 2012.
Keepers over at Reptile World have welcomed four tiny Eyelash Vipers which are being cared for behind the scenes.
Winter is steadily imposing itself on Sydney and the temperatures are dropping. Some of us may crank up the heat, whilst others may don a ‘snuggie’, but what about birds?
Today I was unbelievably lucky to see the equivalent of zoological hidden treasure here at Taronga Zoo.
A Little Penguin which nearly suffocated due to a fishing net was rehabilitated by Taronga Wildlife Hospital and released back into the wild!
Taronga frog specialists are getting ready to take 500 zoo-bred Southern Corroboree Frog eggs back to the Kosciuszko National Park.
Over at Backyard to Bush we’ve commenced some exciting renovations to the playground and water play area just outside the barn.

Pages

Twitter

RT : 21 magical, nocturnal nights to go at and #VividSydney 2016! https://t.co/0yiEGyuup6
It's almost time for this spiny star to light up ! Share your photos with us by tagging #vividtaronga https://t.co/RjTwGf83lx
RT : . is playing a key role in saving Australian honeyeaters, with only hundreds left in the wild. https://t.co/PKlzv8kDbQ #9News

Public Notices

As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.
Taronga's male elephant Luk Chai is being seen by an expert elephant dentist tomorrow to check out his teeth and tusks. Luk Chai has especially small brittle tusks which, through normal play he damages and has suffered recurrent infections.