Amphibian IVF

Developing Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) for critically endangered Australian amphibians 

Assisted reproductive techniques (ART), similar to that used in humans have been adapted for many species of wildlife around the world. Now, we hope to develop and use ART with four critically endangered Australian frog species: the Corroboree Frog (Pseudophryne corroboree) the Booroolong Frog (Litoria booroolongensis), the Alpine Tree Frog (Litoria verreauxi alpina) and the (Litoria aurea). The specific project objectives are to:

  1. develop novel hormone regimens for gamete collection using common species, and apply the refined techniques to closely related endangered species
  2. increase the reproductive output of endangered species by developing innovative IVF techniques that can be implemented by zoos
  3. determine the influence of intrinsic parental quality and genetic compatibility on fertilisation rates and offspring viability and
  4. assess the re-introduction success of ART-generated individuals under variable environmental conditions.

The knowledge gained from this research program will contribute substantially to the implementation of ART in zoological institutions and will aid the preservation and genetic management of Australia’s unique amphibian fauna.

Project Partners:

Taronga: Dr Peter Harlow, Mr Michael McFadden
University of Wollongong: Dr Phillip Byrne, Aimee Silla 
Office of Environment and Heritage: Dr David Hunter

For more information contact:

Taronga Conservation Science Initiative

Contact: 
Rebecca Spindler, Manager, Research and Conservation
Phone: 
+61 2 9978 4608

Become part of our future

Join with us on this exciting journey by making a donation towards the Taronga Conservation Science Initiative.