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Australian Sea-lion

The Australian Sea-lion is the only seal found on our coasts and nowhere else, so Taronga’s breeding program and drive to publicise the dangers of overfishing are vital to its survival.

Red Panda Breeding Program

The rapid growth of human populations in its native range around Nepal, India, Myanmar, Bhutan and China has destroyed much of the Red Panda’s habitat. This species’ numbers has fallen by 40 per cent in the last 50 years.

Western Lowland Gorilla Breeding Program

The Congo habitats of many gorillas are being destroyed by mining for minerals including coltan, which is used in mobile phones. Join Taronga’s campaign to recycle phones and save gorillas.

Francois’ Langur Breeding Program

Habitat loss and hunting for meat and traditional medicines are driving this primate towards extinction, but Taronga’s breeding program is helping provide a future for the Francois' Langur.

Fijian Crested Iguana Breeding Program

This vivid green lizard is thriving only on one Fijian island, so to ensure the species survives in the case that habitat is destroyed, groups of iguanas are being moved to other islands.

Chimpanzee Breeding Program

This famous primate is threatened by habitat loss in west and central Africa, but also by the pet and bush meat trades, which is why Taronga supports a Ugandan chimp sanctuary.

Snow Leopard Breeding Program

This big cat is an elusive and beautiful creature, which is becoming even rarer due to poachers who hunt it for its pelt, and to sell its body parts for use in traditional medicines.

Sumatran Tiger Breeding Program

The rainforest habitat of this small tiger is being destroyed to clear the way for palm plantations. Taronga has joined with zoos around the world to publicise its plight.

Przewalski's Horse (Takhi) Breeding Program

The Przewalski’s Horse has been extinct in the wild since the 1960s, so the small number that live in zoos such as Taronga Western Plains Zoo are vital to the survival of the species.

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