The Southern Corroboree Frog is Australia's most critically endangered frog species, probably because of a disease caused by the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus. The fungus is thought to have entered Australia on frogs used in laboratory testing and is killing millions of amphibians around the world. Without a successful captive breeding and release program, this species will be extinct within five to 10 years, but breeding this species has proven very difficult.

Corroboree Frog

This project tested the potential benefits of reintroducing the eggs of the Southern Corroboree Frog into the wild by placing them directly into artificial pools, which will hopefully remain a Chytrid-free micro-habitat for the development of these valuable frogs.

The development of these eggs was monitored through to a late tadpole stage, and the resulting metamorphs were not infected with the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus. Given that the fungus is now threatening amphibian species everywhere, the importance of this project is far reaching. 

Found only high in the Snowy Mountains of Kosciuszko National Park, this beautiful black and golden frog is one of Australia's most endangered species. Our herpetofauna staff have been successful in breeding frogs of many species, and continued zoo-based breeding efforts of Corroboree Frogs can be viewed at the environmentally controlled container near Reptile World at Taronga Zoo.