Introducing Sabai the Asian Elephant calf Find Out More
Save up to 20% off online tickets! BUY NOW
Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
Time has flown by as keepers try to keep up with baby Francois Langur, Ganju’s amazing progress. Yesterday, he celebrated his three week birthday, a big milestone in any infants life.
Volunteers and keepers spent yesterday afternoon and today tracking the 43 Regents that we have sent out into the wild.
Monday's Qantas flight to Albury carrying the second group of 21 Regents was delayed due to thick fog, with the temperature plunging down to 1.5C!! Glad I was there last week!!
Today we had a very sad reminder of just how vulnerable our precious native wildlife is. A male Common Wombat was bought to Taronga’s Wildlife Hospital late yesetrday after being hit by a car.
Taronga celebrates the dedication of its volunteers during National Volunteer Week. Check out the video and learn more about the Zoos’ quiet achievers
This morning our local volunteers came out to help and then we opened the tent zippers on two tents.One group of Regents flew out in about five minutes and the second group left gradually, with the last two birds really taking their time and flying off after about two hours.
Not many people realise what it takes to make sure all of the animals at Taronga Zoo are fed the appropriate diet. With many species, this needs to include live vertebrates, or insects. That doesn’t mean a fly here and there or a cricket or two. We are talking in the tens of thousands and tens of kilos.
The first group of Regent Honeyeaters arrived in their transport boxes on a Qantas flight at Albury airport yesterday morning. They then made the journey with keepers to the Chiltern release site.
It was a sad day for primate keepers when our eldest juvenile female gorilla, Mbeli, departed for Melbourne Zoo last Tuesday.Our keepers have been working very closely with her over the past few months training her for this big day. Mbeli came to be understand basic cues like target, stay and hold. This enabled our keepers to move her calmly away from the gorilla group leading to a perfect separation when all was ready for her to go to Melbourne.
We arrived in Chiltern late yesterday and have spent today setting up the temporary housing for the Regents. This involved putting up the tents, putting tarps over the tents and constructing branches for perching inside the tents. It is essential that everything is securely in place, as we have heard we might have gale force winds coming our way!!

Pages