10 year program of developments announced for Taronga’s Zoos Find Out More ▶
Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video ▶
4 out of 5 species of Rhino are in critical danger Find Out More ▶
After our Bird Show, it is not uncommon that people will come down and ask us just how we train our birds. How do we get them to display their amazing behaviours? And, how is it that they do not fly away? The answer is easy, positive reinforcement.
We had an eventful start to 2011 when our newest Red-tailed Cockatoo, Keer-Jan-Dee, flew away.
In case you don’t know who I am yet, I’m Brendan, a bird trainer from Taronga Zoo, who has spent the last 10 months on a keeper exchange to Toronto Zoo, Canada.
Hi, bird trainer Brendan here, the one on the exchange program in Canada. Working over seas gives me so many opportunities to work with animals I have never trained before, from skunks, to yak, to raccoons and … Violet Turacos!? Never heard of the word turaco before? I don’t blame you, neither did I until I came here. The species I am working with is also called a Violaceous Plantain-eater, but I suppose that doesn’t help you either.
At the Taronga Zoo Free Flight Bird Show, we not only give our visitors an insight into the amazing life of birds, but our birds also help contribute towards conservation of species in the wild.
Beaver-tails, funnel cakes, baseball, peppers (capsicums!) and skunks. None of these were part of my world until recently, some of these weren’t even part of my vocabulary and in retrospect I think I still wish funnel cakes wasn’t.
Once found weak and unable to fly, Barinya the White Bellied Sea Eagle has slowly graduated to short flights over the amphitheatre at the QBE Free Flight Bird Show which she now calls home.
Hi, I am Natasha, Aboriginal Education Officer at Taronga Zoo. Since recently starting at the zoo I've been caught up in school holiday fever with all the NAIDOC celebrations that are going on in the Zoo. NAIDOC week recognises Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and their contributions to the Australian community.
The other day I went out of the zoo to fly my female Peregrine Falcon, Nike. I’ve been training Nike since October now and everyday she’s becoming a more and more competent flier.
It’s recently come to the attention of the Bird Show crew that there is a wild Powerful Owl hanging out in the Zoo grounds. Powerful Owls are a vulnerable species often found in wooded areas, along the east coast of Australia, so to have one in the Sydney CBD area is amazing!

Pages