Securing a shared future for wildlife and people

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Black Rhino Kufara

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is excited for the arrival of the pitter patter of little Black Rhinoceros calf feet in May 2017, with Kufara expecting her first calf.

“Kufara’s pregnancy is yet another success for the keepers and veterinary team at the Zoo who work tirelessly for the conservation of this critically endangered species,” said Keeper Linda Matthews.

This is Kufara’s first pregnancy and when her calf is born we will welcome the third generation of Black Rhino to be born here at Taronga Western Plains Zoo,” said Linda.

The Zoo has been very successful in breeding Black Rhinoceros with 12 calves born to the program over the 22 year history of the program.

“Every birth for a critically endangered species such as the Black Rhinoceros is vital to ensuring its survival,” said Linda.

Poaching continues to be a major threat to the long-term survival of this species, with demand for rhinoceros horn surging across Asia.

The gestation period for Black Rhinoceros is 14 – 16 months and so far keepers and veterinarians at the Zoo are happy with Kufara’s progress to date.

“This is Kufara’s first calf so she will be monitored closely as her due date approaches. We are all really excited about the pending arrival of her calf in the coming months,” said Linda.

Taronga Western Plains Zoo plays an important role insuring Black Rhinoceros and other endangered species survive and engage people in efforts to protect our wildlife. The Zoo works closely with the International Rhino Foundation to support conservation efforts for wild rhinos in Africa, Indonesia and India, including habitat protection and reforestation, anti-poaching and rhino protection units and reduction of human-rhino conflict.   

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