Securing a shared future for wildlife and people

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*UPDATE: 17 January 2018 3.30pm

 

The Swamp Wallaby found on the Sydney Harbour Bridge yesterday and brought in to Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital has done well overnight and today.

While he is still in a serious condition due to the stress he experienced, everyone is hopeful about his recovery as he has started to take on food.

Dr Larry Vogelnest, Senior Veterinarian at the Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital, has assessed the wallaby this morning. “We would like to release him as soon as possible, when he is well enough. We have not yet confirmed where, we will find a suitable environment around Sydney but not too close to the city”.

We will continue to keep the public updated on his condition.

 

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*UPDATE: 17 January 2018 9.00am

 

The Swamp Wallaby found on the Sydney Harbour Bridge yesterday and brought in to Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital has done well overnight.

While he is still in a serious condition due to the stress he experienced, everyone is hopeful about his recovery.

Dr Larry Vogelnest, Senior Veterinarian at the Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital, has assessed the wallaby this morning. “We would like to release him as soon as possible, when he is well enough. We have not yet confirmed where, we will find a suitable environment around Sydney but not too close to the city”.

We will continue to keep the public updated on his condition.

 

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UPDATE: 16 January 2018 3.00pm

 

The Swamp Wallaby is in a serious but stable condition. He is awake and recovering slowly.

We will continue to monitor him closely over the next 24 hours and will provide an update tomorrow morning.

 

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FOR RELEASE:  16 January 2018 8.45am

At 6.30am this morning, a male adult Swamp Wallaby was brought into Taronga Wildlife Hospital in Sydney by NSW Police following an incident on the Sydney Harbour Bridge. The animal was thoroughly assessed by Senior Veterinarian Dr Larry Vogelnest, including a full body X-Ray, which thankfully did not reveal any significant injuries.  The wallaby has been administered pain medication and fluids and is currently in Taronga’s Wildlife Intensive Care Unit for recovery and further monitoring. We will provide further updates on his condition later today.

“The swamp wallaby remains in a stable condition at Taronga Wildlife Hospital’s Intensive Care Unit,” says Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian Larry Vogelnest. “At this stage, it doesn’t appear to have any serious injuries, however, it will be carefully assessed over the next 24–48 hours. As with all wildlife brought into our care, our hope is that the wallaby will be able to be released back into the wild. An assessment will be made on the best location for this release in due course.”

 

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Media Contact:

Sarah Lievore slievore@zoo.nsw.gov.au 02 9978 4606 or 0403 513 963

 

About Taronga Conservation Society Australia

Taronga Conservation Society Australia (Taronga) is a leader in the fields of conservation, research, animal welfare, wildlife rehabilitation and environmental education. Taronga is a not-for-profit organisation with an absolute commitment to conservation and securing a shared future for wildlife and people.

Taronga’s staff, scientists and researchers are experts in their fields. They work in partnerships with governments, universities and conservation organisations to support dozens of science, research and conservation projects and programs across Australia and around the world.

Taronga participates in regional and global conservation breeding programs to establish insurance populations for species threatened in the wild, from Australia’s tiny and critically endangered Corroboree Frog to the Asian Elephant.

Taronga’s two Zoos, Taronga Zoo in Sydney and Taronga Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, create experiences for its 1.7 million guests that inspire lasting connections between and wildlife. Through education programs, community engagement, and environmental campaigning, Taronga works to create the next-generation of conservation champions.

Taronga believes that a future without wildlife is not an option Taronga is for the wild.

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