Securing a shared future for wildlife and people

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Our most iconic marsupial needs your help! By learning more about wild koalas and where they live, we can make the best choices to ensure their future.
Khewzi moves to African Savannah exhibit
The birth of Australia’s first Greater One-horned Rhino calf on October 25, 2015 is a landmark for Taronga Western Plains Zoo and global rhinoceros conservation.
Keepers at Taronga Western Plains Zoo have been busy hand raising a little male Banteng calf.
This week we said ‘see you later’ to our three remaining tigers, Jumilah, Kartika and Kembali as they headed off to their temporary home at Taronga Western Plains Zoo.
This year, on Saturday October 31st, Taronga Zoo will be hosting it’s very first “Boo at the Zoo” Halloween Spooktacular!
Taronga’s reptile keepers were saddened to say goodbye to the Zoo’s grand old Komodo Dragon, Tuka, today.
Wildlife conservation is at the heart of Taronga Western Plains Zoo and Carnivore Keeper Linda Matthews witnessed this first hand on a recent fellowship trip to Botswana.
We are about to enter a new and exciting phase of Taronga’s Centenary Development. This means we’re saying ‘see you later’ to our much-loved tiger group as we start construction on new tiger facilities.
It’s a bitter pill to swallow, but Australia has the worst mammal extinction rate in the world with a significant proportion of the surviving animals and plants listed as threatened. The Greater Bilby is one such species.

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Watch 9:30pm on ABC News 24 this evening to learn about exciting new #FeathertailGlider research… https://t.co/cfF536fukj
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Public Notices

Update on three year old White Rhino Macheo
As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.