Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
The impact that zoos can have on the conservation of species is limited by the amount of space and resources they can offer to house and breed each species. Zoos therefore carefully balance the resources available with the potential contribution to a species’ survival. This means that each animal in the zoo must have a clearly defined role so that the available resources go to the best possible conservation outcomes. Read more here.
Following a successful rehabilitation at the Taronga Wildlife hospital, 11 sea birds have been released off the coast of Sydney Harbour. They included a Red-tailed Tropicbird, two Little Penguins and eight Sooty Terns.
Jarrah is a six month old Quokka joey which is currently being hand-raised here at Taronga by Keeper Kristal. At this age, the joey’s tiny and needs full time care.
Keepers were delighted a fortnight ago by the arrival of two Przewalski’s Horse foals three days apart.
Our female Sun Bear which is just about to turn three years old has really been busy.
From being a frail little puggle, Beau has grown and now looks like a real echidna!
In the last fortnight, 14 Sooty Terns believed to be from the Lord Howe Island Breeding colonies have been admitted to our Taronga Zoo Wildlife Hospital.
There are some great icicles you can make and store ready for that really hot day to make life a little easier for your dog. They’re also a whole lot of fun too. Mixes such as pet milk watered down, some squished sardines and water are great and cheap too. A little harder to source, but definitely worth the effort are blood icicles. Depending what type of fresh meat you purchase for your pet, you may be able to collect some blood each time and put aside for use.
Are animals in the wild happier?? Taronga takes its responsibilities for animal welfare very seriously. We acknowledge the wild nature of animals in our care. This compels us to provide the type of environment and diverse experiences that the animal’s biology has evolved to expect and to cope with. We understand that zoos cannot truly replicate the wild but, as far as possible, we can reproduce the animal’s natural environment and take into consideration the animal’s behavioural and physiological needs.
It’s been a year since George the Loggerhead Turtle was released off Lord Howe Island, yet the Taronga Wildlife Hospital is still keeping an eye on him!

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Public Notices

Update on three year old White Rhino Macheo
As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.