Scott Gooding's BBQ Prawns

Scott Gooding's BBQ Prawns

#Act for the Wild, #Taronga Conservation Society Australia

Posted on 22nd December 2017 by Media Relations

BBQ Prawns
BBQ Prawns

Taronga Zoo is proud to have collaborated with health coach, author and sustainable seafood advocate, Scott Gooding, to share MSC sustainable seafood recipes this summer. Scott has several other delicious recipes too for fresh inspiration. 

Nothing screams Australian summer than BBQ prawns – it is simply un-Australian not to have a BBQ prawn recipe up your sleeve. This is so easy and can work with marron or lobster. You can use the butter to baste the prawns as well applying to the cooked prawns. 

I prefer to cook prawns with their head on, add more flavour but if you find this confronting ask you fish monger for butterflied prawns which have been trimmed.  It’s possible to leave the prawn in its shell and remove the intestinal tract by making a cut in the back of the prawn and removing.

Serves 4 

Ingredients  

24 MSC certified banana prawns (More than 50% of wild-caught prawns in Australia are MSC certified sustainable!)

120g salted butter

3 garlic cloves – minced

½ bunch fresh parsley – chopped

1 long red chilli – deseeded and roughly chopped

1 lemon – juiced

Sea salt

Black pepper

Method

  1. Heat the BBQ in advance on a medium temperature
  2. Add the butter on a low/medium heat in a fry pan for 2 minutes
  3. Add the garlic, chilli and cook for further 2 minutes
  4. Add the fresh herbs and cook for further 1 min
  5. Remove from the flame but keep warm to avoid becoming a solid – unlikely in the Australian Summer
  6. Thrown the prawns on the BBQ
  7. Using a brush – smear some of the butter on the prawns as they cook, ensuring both sides are covered
  8. Reserve some of the butter for the prawns once they are cooked
  9. Cook for 1-2 minutes on each side
  10. Once cooked through, remove from the BBQ and coat with more herb butter and a drizzle of lemon
  11. Season
  12. Almost 90% of our oceans are overfished or overexploited – but it is possible to make good choices when you’re choosing seafood. Next time you’re shopping for seafood, look for the MSC eco-label and you can help ensure we have fish for the future.

Read more about sustainable seafood and what you can to do help.