Securing a shared future for wildlife and people Watch the Video
There was a buzz in the air as our guests arrived, cameras clicking and smiles all round. With the spectacular view of Sydney Harbour in the background, this was clearly going to be an exciting event as the finalists for Tourism Australia’s The Best Jobs in the World competition joined keepers in the Bird Show amphitheatre. To greet them, there was myself and some other members of the Taronga team, including a Diamond Python, Short-beaked Echidna, White-tailed Cockatoo and my counterpart “Nangaw”, the Powerful Owl.
Taronga Zoo is home to six Australian File Snakes. You may have walked past them in Reptile World but may have not stopped to appreciate how amazing they are. They live in fresh water and their rough scales help them hold fast on to fish that become a meal. Even more fascinating is that they can devour a whole fish in 15 seconds! See the video of them during mealtime here.
Taronga Zoo celebrates NAIDOC week for three weeks every year, providing an opportunity for visitors to discover more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their culture and their connections to animals.
Every day, our gorillas are given a variety of leaves and branches for them to eat as part of their diet, but some days it seems like more fun for the young gorillas to either run around with them or try their hand at building nests. Recently, our five year old male, Fuzu, found himself out on exhibit with lots of Olive branches, so he tried his hand at making a day nest.
Seal Keeper Ady recently returned from a voyage to Antarctica. She was onboard a cruise ship sharing her passion and knowledge of the amazing animals that call this frozen continent home. Ady said that there were so many once in a life time experiences, but her breath was absolutely taken away when she stood Salisbury Plains surrounded by hundreds of thousands of King Penguins. See some of the incredible photos and hear about her adventure to Antarctica here.
Taronga’s Keeper have been busy behind-the-scenes with a new male Cassowary that arrived last year. The bird named Chuck was very slowly introduced to a female bird as this species only comes together to mate. There have been good signs so far with the two breeding. Read the latest developments by Keeper Brooke Taylor here.
The Cross River Gorilla is a highly elusive species that lives on the Cross River that straddles the Nigeria and Cameroon Border. Sadly this species is on the cusp of extinction with the biggest threat being hunting. Taronga financially contributes to a project to protect this magnificent animal. During 2012 over 35 patrols removed more than 3000 snares and 1000 bullet casings. Read the full update on this project here.
Qwikila our new Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo is proving herself to be quite a character. The adult female arrived from Belfast Zoo earlier this year as part of the international breeding program for this endangered species. Even though she hasn’t been at Taronga for long, keepers report that she has settled in well and been busy making the most of the Australian sun. Find out more about this important new female, here.
The newest arrivals to be welcomed at Taronga Western Plains Zoo are a Swamp Wallaby joey and a Red-neck Wallaby joey.
For those who are not familiar with Take 3, we are a not for profit group (real people - surfers, divers and beach lovers ) promoting a simple message -"Take 3” pieces of rubbish when you leave the beach, waterway or anywhere. Our mantra is "Pick it up Bin it Take 3 for the Sea"

Pages

Twitter

Sorry you had to wait Delia, it was a sold out night so very busy! We hope the bus arrived and you h… https://t.co/3zxwQcYygE
Sorry you had a poor experience, it was our first sold out night so very busy! We are now reviewing our… https://t.co/pXDVWtihp2
Check out the amazing invention by cleaning up our #oceans. Got an idea too? Visit… https://t.co/XqAjd8gHpd

Public Notices

Update on three year old White Rhino Macheo
As part of a 10 year Centenary Master Plan upgrade, Taronga has submitted plans to build an Australian Habitat Exhibit (phase 1) which includes an overnight conservation experience called the Taronga Wildlife Retreat.
Taronga Zoo would not dissect animals for public display. Taronga’s first concern is always for the welfare and dignity of the remarkable animals in our care.
Taronga Zoo’s young male elephant, Luk Chai, 5, had some dental work on his tusks today. Taronga’s Senior Veterinarian, Dr Larry Vogelnest, said some elephants including Luk Chai, have brittle tusks that are prone to cracking and infection.